Blog, Reloading

The Ultimate Reloading Guide

A cool tactical image for the ultimate reloading guide with reloading tools

Table of Contents

The Ultimate Guide to Ammunition Reloading

Reloading is popular among many gun holders, but did you know it is a culture that started long ago with the early shooters?

Whether you want to improve your gunsmithing skills, save on some ammo, or do it for fun, custom-making your ammo might be necessary. That is, of course, if you don’t mind the time investment.

But as you will find out, spending time might not be as big a deal as learning a great skill in making your own ammo.

And while you might be wondering whether it’s worth it or not or where to begin, this guide will provide most of the answers you seek.

History of ammunition reloading

[return to table of contents]

Reloading ammunition, which involves reusing the components of spent cartridges to create new rounds, has a long history. It has been a common practice among shooters and hunters for many years, as it allows them to save money and create ammunition that is tailored to their specific needs.

The practice of reloading ammunition dates back to the early days of firearms, when guns were much less reliable and required frequent cleaning and maintenance. In order to keep their weapons in good working order, shooters would often collect the spent cartridges that were ejected after firing, clean them, and then reload them with new powder and projectiles.

Way before the invention of the metallic cartridge case in the mid-1800s, shooters would reload and maintain their guns. It was common to see them with black powder (mostly kept in a powder horn), patches, flash powder, lubricant, a bullet mold, and any assortment necessary for reloading ammunition.

With some even making all the components themselves, the cost of shooting was relatively minimal. However, a lot changed in the mid-1800s after the creation of the early cartridge case – made of rimfire – and not reloadable. This made the cost of shooting rise.

By the 1870s, reloadable cases started making their way into the US. Subsequently, in the 1880s, companies such as Marlin, Winchester, The Ideal Manufacturing Company ( now Lyman), Sharps, and others started supplying tools and components for cartridges and guns. The companies were answering to the increase in demand for handloading—to lower the cost of shooting and tailor ammunition to specific needs such as target shooting and hunting.

As firearms technology improved and guns became more reliable, the need to reload ammunition decreased, but the practice remained popular among shooters who enjoyed the cost savings and the ability to customize their ammunition. In the early 20th century, the development of smokeless powder made reloading even more popular, as it allowed shooters to create smaller, more powerful rounds that were better suited for hunting and competition shooting.

From the 1890s, rifles using smokeless powder became popular, bringing a challenge to handloading. Back in the black powder cartridge era, you could fill the case with the proper burn rate and then seat your bullet. With the smokeless powder, you had to accurately weigh it as it did not fill the case. This was made worse by the fact that there were limited tools and very little data on the accurate measure of powder. Hence came the handheld tong tool—the most popular reloading tool by then. Using one, you could decap cases, prime them, neck size and fill them with black powder, seat a bullet, and crimp it.

Furthermore, the smokeless cartridges did not have cast bullets, which were easy to reconstruct. Instead, they had the jacketed bullet, which was neither readily available nor easy to alter.

Decades later, companies started creating handloading tools for the smokeless powder period. Bench-mounted presses—that supported full-size case sizing—started replacing the handheld tools. Priming tools, quality measures, and case trimmers also made their way into reloading.

The exact date of the first reloading press is not known, but the concept of reloading ammunition has been around for centuries. The first recorded mention of reloading ammunition was in the 1500s, when a German military manual described the process of reloading black powder cartridges.
Over time, the process of reloading ammunition has evolved and become more sophisticated, and the tools and equipment that are used for reloading have become more advanced. The first reloading presses were likely developed in the 1800s, as the technology for manufacturing precision mechanical tools became more advanced.
Today, there are many different types of reloading press available, ranging from simple, manually-operated presses to advanced, mechanically-assisted presses that are capable of producing large quantities of ammunition quickly and efficiently. Despite the many advances in technology, the basic principles of reloading ammunition have remained largely unchanged since the early days of the practice.

World war II brought advancements in weaponry; years after the war, the golden era for reloading began. Vernon speers started ‘Speer’ in the 1940s and created bullets with .22 rimfire cases. In 1947 Loren Harbor, Jim Spivy, and Frank Snow started Sierra bullets and brought super-accurate bullets for hunters and match shooters. John Nosler started Nosler in 1948 and developed the partition hunting bullet. Joyce Hornady came into the scene in 1949 when he began making hunting bullets.

Since then, there have been several bullet companies, and most continue manufacturing and advancing reloading tools, leaving an array of choices in the hands of the modern handloader.

Today, reloading ammunition is a widespread practice, with many shooters and hunters choosing to reload their own ammunition for a variety of reasons. It is a popular hobby that allows people to save money, create ammunition that is tailored to their specific needs, and take greater control over the quality of their ammunition.

 

Essential equipment for reloading

[return to table of contents]
If you are interested in getting into the hobby of reloading ammunition, there are a few key tools that you will need to get started. These include:

A reloading press

[return to top of section]

This is the most important tool for reloading ammunition, as it is used to resize and deprime spent cartridges, as well as to seat new projectiles and crimp the completed rounds. There are many different types of reloading presses available, ranging from simple hand-operated presses to more complex, bench-mounted models.

There are several different types of reloading press that are commonly used by people who are interested in reloading ammunition. The most common types of reloading press include:
  • Single-stage press: This is the most basic type of reloading press, and is typically used for the initial sizing and depriming of spent cartridges. Single-stage presses are simple, manually-operated devices that are typically mounted on a bench or other work surface.
  • Turret press: A turret press is a more advanced type of reloading press that is similar to a single-stage press, but with the added ability to switch between multiple reloading dies without having to change the die on the press. This allows the shooter to perform multiple reloading operations on a single cartridge without having to remove and replace the die each time.
  • Progressive press: A progressive press is a type of reloading press that is designed to automate the reloading process, allowing the shooter to produce large quantities of completed cartridges quickly and efficiently. Progressive presses typically have multiple stations where different reloading operations are performed, and are able to automatically feed and index the cartridges as they are being reloaded.
  • Hand press: A hand press is a small, portable reloading press that is designed to be used without the need for a bench or other work surface. Hand presses are typically used for small-scale reloading operations, and are popular with shooters who need to reload ammunition while on the go.
The type of reloading press that is best for you will depend on your specific needs and preferences. Single-stage and turret presses are good choices for beginners, as they are easy to use and allow for a high level of control over the reloading process. Progressive presses are best for experienced reloaders who need to produce large quantities of ammunition quickly, while hand presses are a good choice for shooters who need a portable reloading solution.

Reloading dies

[return to top of section]
These are specialized tools that are used in conjunction with the reloading press to resize and shape the components of spent cartridges. Reloading dies are available in a wide range of sizes and styles, and are typically specific to the type of cartridge that you are reloading.
Reloading dies are specialized tools that are used in conjunction with a reloading press to resize and shape the components of spent cartridges. There are several different types of reloading die that are commonly used, and each type serves a different purpose in the reloading process. The most common types of reloading die include:
  • Full-length sizing die: This type of reloading die is used to resize the entire length of the cartridge case, ensuring that it is properly sized for the chamber of the firearm that it will be used in. Full-length sizing dies are typically used for the initial sizing of the cartridge case, and are an important step in the reloading process to ensure that the finished cartridge will chamber and function properly.
  • Neck sizing die: A neck sizing die is used to resize only the neck of the cartridge case, leaving the body of the case unchanged. This is useful for cartridges that will be used in a bolt-action rifle, as it helps to ensure that the cartridge will chamber and extract properly. Neck sizing dies are typically used for cartridges that will be fired multiple times in the same rifle, as it helps to prolong the life of the cartridge case.
  • Bullet seating die: This type of reloading die is used to seat the bullet in the cartridge case, ensuring that it is properly positioned and seated to the correct depth. Bullet seating dies are typically adjustable, allowing the shooter to fine-tune the seating depth of the bullet to achieve the desired performance from the finished cartridge.
  • Crimping die: A crimping die is used to apply a crimp to the mouth of the cartridge case, helping to hold the bullet in place and prevent it from moving or shifting during handling or firing. Crimping dies are typically used for cartridges that will be used in semi-automatic firearms, as the crimp helps to ensure reliable feeding and extraction of the cartridge.

In addition to these basic types of reloading die, there are many other specialized dies that are available for specific applications or cartridge types. These can include expander dies for neck sizing, taper crimp dies for certain cartridge types, and various other dies that are designed to perform specific tasks in the reloading process. The type of reloading die that is best for you will depend on the type of cartridge that you are reloading, as well as your specific needs and preferences.

What is the Difference Between a Powder measure and a Powder Scale?

[return to top of section]
A powder measure and a powder scale are two different tools that are commonly used in the reloading of ammunition. While they are both used to dispense and measure the amount of powder that is used in each cartridge, they serve different purposes and operate in different ways. In general, the powder measure is used to dispense the powder for each cartridge, while the powder scale is used to verify the weight of the powder to ensure that it is correct. This allows the reloader to quickly and accurately dispense the correct amount of powder for each cartridge, while also ensuring that the finished cartridges are consistent and safe to use.

Powder measure

[return to top of section]
Powder measures are tools that are used in the reloading of ammunition to dispense the correct amount of powder for each cartridge. There are several different types of powder measures available, each of which has its own unique features and benefits. Some of the most common types of powder measures include:
  • Hand-operated powder measures: These are the most basic type of powder measure, and are typically small, manually-operated devices that are used to dispense powder by hand. Hand-operated powder measures are typically used for small-scale reloading operations, and are popular with shooters who need a portable reloading solution.
  • Bench-mounted powder measures: These are larger, more advanced powder measures that are typically mounted on the reloading press or a separate stand. Bench-mounted powder measures are typically used for larger-scale reloading operations, and are known for their accuracy and consistency. Some bench-mounted powder measures are mechanically assisted, which allows the shooter to dispense powder more quickly and easily.
  • Rotary powder measures: Rotary powder measures are a type of powder measure that uses a rotating drum to dispense powder. These powder measures are typically mounted on the reloading press, and are known for their accuracy and consistency. Rotary powder measures are popular with shooters who need to dispense large quantities of powder quickly and accurately.
  • Micro-adjustable powder measures: These are advanced powder measures that are designed to allow the shooter to make fine adjustments to the amount of powder that is dispensed. Micro-adjustable powder measures are typically mounted on the reloading press, and are known for their ability to dispense very precise amounts of powder. They are popular with shooters who need to produce very consistent, accurate cartridges.

The type of powder measure that is best for you will depend on your specific needs and preferences. Hand-operated powder measures are a good choice for shooters who need a portable reloading solution, while bench-mounted and rotary powder measures are better for larger-scale reloading operations. Micro-adjustable powder measures are a good choice for shooters who need to produce very consistent, accurate cartridges.

Powder Scales

[return to top of section]

The type of powder scale that is best for you will depend on your specific needs and preferences. Balance beam and dial scales are good choices for shooters who prefer a simple, mechanically-operated powder scale, while electronic and bench scales are good choices for shooters who want a more accurate and precise way to measure the powder for their ammunition. These types of scales use electronic sensors and digital displays to give a more accurate reading of the weight of the powder. They are also generally easier to use and offer more features, such as the ability to store and retrieve multiple weight readings, or to automatically dispense the correct amount of powder for a given load. Electronic and bench scales are often preferred by experienced reloaders who want to achieve the most accurate and consistent results possible.

Balance beam powder scales and dial scales

[return to top of section]
Balance beam scales and dial scales are a good choice for shooters who prefer a simple, mechanically-operated powder scale. These types of powder scales are typically smaller and less expensive than other types of powder scales, and are known for their durability and ease of use.
Some of the key advantages of balance beam and dial scales include:
  • Affordability: Balance beam and dial scales are typically less expensive than other types of powder scales, which makes them a good choice for shooters who are on a budget. These scales are typically made from simple, durable materials, which keeps their cost down without sacrificing accuracy or reliability.
  • Ease of use: Balance beam and dial scales are typically very easy to use, which makes them a good choice for shooters who are new to reloading or who prefer a simple, straightforward powder scale. These scales typically use a simple mechanical lever or dial to measure the weight of the powder, which allows the shooter to quickly and easily determine the correct amount of powder for each cartridge.
  • Portability: Balance beam and dial scales are typically small and portable, which makes them a good choice for shooters who need a powder scale that can be easily carried to the range or other shooting locations. These scales are typically lightweight and compact, and can be easily transported in a range bag or other carrying case.
Balance beam and dial scales are a good choice for shooters who prefer a simple, mechanically-operated powder scale. These scales are affordable, easy to use, and portable, which makes them well-suited for a wide range of reloading applications.

Electronic powder scales and bench powder scales

[return to top of section]
Electronic and bench powder scales are a good choice for shooters who need to measure large quantities of powder accurately and consistently. These types of powder scales are typically larger and more advanced than other types of powder scales, and are designed to handle the demands of large-scale reloading operations.
Some of the key advantages of electronic and bench powder scales include:
  • Accuracy: Electronic and bench powder scales are known for their accuracy and precision, which is critical for ensuring that the finished cartridges are consistent and safe to use. These scales use advanced electronic sensors or mechanical levers to measure the weight of the powder, and are typically accurate to within a few tenths of a grain.
  • Durability: Electronic and bench powder scales are typically built to be durable and able to withstand the demands of heavy use. These scales are typically made from high-quality materials and are designed to be robust and reliable, which is important for shooters who need to measure large quantities of powder on a regular basis.
  • Convenience: Electronic and bench powder scales are typically designed to be easy to use, which is important for shooters who need to measure large quantities of powder quickly and efficiently. These scales often feature digital displays and easy-to-use controls, which allows the shooter to quickly and accurately measure the powder for each cartridge.
Electronic and bench powder scales are a good choice for shooters who need to measure large quantities of powder accurately and consistently. These scales offer a high level of accuracy and durability, and are designed to be convenient and easy to use, making them well-suited for large-scale reloading operations.

Reloading manuals

[return to top of section]
This is a reference book that provides detailed information on the process of reloading ammunition, as well as specific load data for a wide range of cartridges. Reloading manuals are an essential tool for anyone who is new to reloading, as they provide important safety information and guidance on the proper techniques for reloading ammunition.
Reloading manuals are reference books that provide detailed information on the process of reloading ammunition, as well as specific load data for a wide range of cartridges. These manuals are an essential tool for anyone who is interested in reloading their own ammunition, as they provide important safety information and guidance on the proper techniques for reloading.
In general, reloading manuals are organized into several different sections, each of which covers a different aspect of the reloading process. Some of the key sections that are typically found in a reloading manual include:
  • Introduction: The introduction to a reloading manual typically provides an overview of the manual’s content and purpose, as well as important safety information and guidelines for the use of the manual.
  • Reloading basics: This section of the manual covers the fundamental concepts and principles of reloading ammunition, including information on the components of a cartridge and the tools and equipment that are used in the reloading process.
  • Step-by-step instructions: The majority of a reloading manual is typically devoted to detailed, step-by-step instructions for the reloading of specific cartridges. These instructions are typically organized by cartridge type, and provide detailed information on the correct techniques and procedures for reloading each type of cartridge.
  • Load data: The load data section of the manual provides specific information on the recommended powders, projectiles, and other components that should be used for each type of cartridge. This information is typically organized by cartridge type, and includes detailed load data for a wide range of powders and projectiles.
  • Index: The index of a reloading manual is a comprehensive list of the topics and subjects covered in the manual, along with page numbers for easy reference. This allows the reader to quickly find specific information on a given topic or subject, making it easier to use the manual as a reference.

The organization of a reloading manual is designed to provide easy access to the information that is needed for the safe and effective reloading of ammunition. The manual is typically organized into sections that cover different aspects of the reloading process, and includes detailed instructions, load data, and other information that is essential for the successful reloading of ammunition.

In addition to these basic tools, there are many other specialized tools and accessories that can be used in the reloading process, depending on your specific needs and preferences. These can include trimmers for resizing brass cases, primer pocket cleaners for removing debris from spent cartridges, and deburring tools for smoothing rough edges on brass cases. As you become more experienced with reloading, you may find that you want to invest in additional tools and accessories to make the process easier and more efficient.

Priming tool

[return to top of section]
A priming tool is a specialized piece of equipment that is used to insert a new primer into the primer pocket of a cartridge case. The primer is a small, circular piece of metal that contains a combustible compound. When the firing pin of a gun strikes the primer, it ignites the compound, which in turn ignites the gunpowder in the cartridge, causing the bullet to be propelled out of the barrel.
A priming tool is necessary because the primer must be seated to the correct depth in the primer pocket in order for the cartridge to function properly. Using a priming tool ensures that the primer is properly seated and allows the reloader to easily and consistently insert primers into cartridge cases.

Most of the popular ram presses come equipped with priming tools.

The type of priming tool that is best for a particular reloader will depend on their personal preferences and the type of reloading equipment they are using. Some common types of priming tools include:

  • Hand priming tools: These tools are designed to be held in the hand and used to prime cases manually. They typically have a seating punch and a spring-loaded mechanism that applies pressure to the primer, seating it in the case.
  • Bench priming tools: These tools are designed to be mounted on a reloading bench or other stable surface. They often have a more precise seating mechanism and a larger capacity than hand priming tools.
  • Automatic priming tools: These tools are designed to automatically prime cases as they are fed into the tool. They often use a vibrating or shaking mechanism to ensure that the primer is seated properly in the case.

Loading tray

[return to top of section]
A loading tray is a tool used to hold and organize the cartridge cases and bullets while the reloader is working on them. The tray typically has multiple compartments or slots, each of which is designed to hold a single case or bullet. The reloader will place the cases and bullets in the tray, which helps to keep them organized and prevents them from rolling around or getting mixed up. This can make the reloading process more efficient and help to prevent mistakes. Some loading trays are also designed to be used with a reloading press, allowing the reloader to easily load the cases and bullets into the press as needed.

The type of loading tray that is best for a particular reloader will depend on their personal preferences and the type of reloading equipment they are using. Some common types of loading trays include:

  • Universal loading trays: These trays are designed to fit a range of different case sizes and shapes, making them a good choice for reloaders who use multiple calibers.
  • Caliber-specific loading trays: These trays are designed to fit a specific caliber of case, such as .223 Remington or .308 Winchester. They are often made with tighter tolerances than universal trays, which can help to improve accuracy.
  • Single-stage press loading trays: These trays are designed to be used with single-stage reloading presses, which allow the reloader to perform one operation at a time.
  • Turret press loading trays: These trays are designed to be used with turret presses, which allow the reloader to perform multiple operations at once using a rotating turret.
  • Progressive press loading trays: These trays are designed to be used with progressive presses, which automatically move the case through multiple stations as the reloader performs multiple operations simultaneously.

Shell holder

[return to top of section]
Shell holders are used to hold the cartridge case in place while the reloader is working on it. They are typically used in conjunction with a reloading press and are designed to fit a specific caliber of case. The reloader will place the case in the shell holder and then insert the shell holder into the press, allowing them to perform various operations on the case, such as sizing, depriming, or seating the bullet. Shell holders are important because they help to ensure that the case is held securely in place during these operations, which can improve the accuracy and consistency of the finished rounds.

There are different types of shell holders available. The type of shell holder that is best for a particular reloader will depend on the type of cases and reloading press they are using, as well as their personal preferences. Some common types of shell holders include:

  • Universal shell holders: These shell holders are designed to fit a range of different case sizes and shapes, making them a good choice for reloaders who use multiple calibers.
  • Caliber-specific shell holders: These shell holders are designed to fit a specific caliber of case, such as .223 Remington or .308 Winchester. They are often made with tighter tolerances than universal shell holders, which can help to improve accuracy.
  • Single-stage press shell holders: These shell holders are designed to be used with single-stage reloading presses, which allow the reloader to perform one operation at a time.
  • Turret press shell holders: These shell holders are designed to be used with turret presses, which allow the reloader to perform multiple operations at once using a rotating turret.
  • Progressive press shell holders: These shell holders are designed to be used with progressive presses, which automatically move the case through multiple stations as the reloader performs multiple operations simultaneously.

Powder trickler

[return to top of section]
A powder trickler is a tool used to dispense small amounts of gunpowder. It typically consists of a small container with a narrow spout and a handle for adjusting the flow of powder. The reloader will pour a measured amount of powder into the trickler and then use the handle to dispense small amounts of powder into the scale pan, allowing for very precise measurements of the powder charge. This is important because the amount of powder used in a cartridge can have a significant effect on the performance and safety of the finished round.

There are different types of powder funnels available for the hobby of reloading. The type of funnel that is best for a particular reloader will depend on the type of cases and bullets they are using, as well as their personal preferences. Some common types of powder funnels include:

  • Universal powder funnels: These funnels are designed to fit a range of different case sizes and shapes, making them a good choice for reloaders who use multiple calibers.
  • Caliber-specific powder funnels: These funnels are designed to fit a specific caliber of case, such as .223 Remington or .308 Winchester. They are often made with tighter tolerances than universal funnels, which can help to improve accuracy.
  • Adjustable powder funnels: These funnels have adjustable stems that can be set to the desired length, allowing them to fit a range of case lengths for a particular caliber.
  • Compact powder funnels: These funnels are designed to be small and portable, making them a good choice for reloaders who do their reloading on the go.

Powder funnel

[return to top of section]

The type of funnel that is best for a particular reloader will depend on the type of cases and bullets they are using, as well as their personal preferences. Some common types of powder funnels include:

  • Universal powder funnels: These funnels are designed to fit a range of different case sizes and shapes, making them a good choice for reloaders who use multiple calibers.
  • Caliber-specific powder funnels: These funnels are designed to fit a specific caliber of case, such as .223 Remington or .308 Winchester. They are often made with tighter tolerances than universal funnels, which can help to improve accuracy.
  • Adjustable powder funnels: These funnels have adjustable stems that can be set to the desired length, allowing them to fit a range of case lengths for a particular caliber.
  • Compact powder funnels: These funnels are designed to be small and portable, making them a good choice for reloaders who do their reloading on the go.

In addition to these types, there are also various materials, finishes, and other features to consider when choosing a powder funnel.

Case trimmer

[return to top of section]
A trimmer is a specialized tool that is used in the reloading process to trim the length of the cartridge case to ensure that it is the correct length for the specific cartridge that is being reloaded. This is an important step in the reloading process, as the correct length of the cartridge case is critical for ensuring that the cartridge functions properly and does not cause dangerous pressure levels in the cartridge case.
There are several reasons why a trimmer may be needed during the reloading process. Some of the key situations in which a trimmer may be needed include:
  • After resizing: After the cartridge case has been resized using a full-length sizing die, it is common for the length of the cartridge case to change slightly. In some cases, the cartridge case may be too long or too short after resizing, which can cause problems with the proper functioning of the cartridge. A trimmer can be used to trim the length of the cartridge case to the correct length, ensuring that the cartridge functions properly and does not cause dangerous pressure levels in the cartridge case.
  • After multiple reloadings: Over time, the length of the cartridge case may change due to repeated reloading and firing. In some cases, the cartridge case may become too long or too short after multiple reloading and firing cycles, which can cause problems with the proper functioning of the cartridge. A trimmer can be used to trim the length of the cartridge case to the correct length, ensuring that the cartridge functions properly and does not cause dangerous pressure levels in the cartridge case.
  • When using multiple cartridges: In some cases, a shooter may need to reload cartridges of different lengths, such as rifle cartridges and pistol cartridges. In these cases, it may be necessary to use a trimmer to adjust the length of the cartridge case to the correct length for each specific cartridge. This can help to ensure that the finished cartridges are consistent and ready to use, and can prevent problems with the proper functioning of the cartridge.
A trimmer is an important tool for the reloading process, and can be used to trim the length of the cartridge case to ensure that it is the correct length for the specific cartridge that is being reloaded. By trimming the cartridge case to the correct length, a trimmer can help to ensure that the finished cartridge is consistent, safe, and ready for use.

Deburring tool

[return to top of section]
A deburring tool is a specialized tool that is used in the reloading process to remove burrs, or sharp edges, from the inside and outside of the cartridge case. This is an important step in the reloading process, as burrs can cause problems with the functioning of the cartridge and can lead to dangerous pressure levels in the cartridge case.
There are several reasons why a deburring tool may be needed during the reloading process. Some of the key situations in which a deburring tool may be needed include:
  • After resizing: After the cartridge case has been resized using a full-length sizing die, it is common for burrs to develop on the inside and outside of the cartridge case. These burrs can cause problems with the proper functioning of the cartridge, and can lead to dangerous pressure levels in the cartridge case. A deburring tool can be used to remove these burrs, ensuring that the cartridge case is smooth and ready for the next step in the reloading process.
  • After trimming: In some cases, it may be necessary to trim the length of the cartridge case to ensure that it is the correct length for the specific cartridge that is being reloaded. This process can sometimes cause burrs to develop on the outside of the cartridge case, which can cause problems with the proper functioning of the cartridge. A deburring tool can be used to remove these burrs, ensuring that the cartridge case is smooth and ready for the next step in the reloading process.
  • After chamfering: Chamfering is a process that is used to create a smooth, angled edge on the inside and outside of the cartridge case. This can help to ensure that the cartridge case is properly aligned in the chamber of the firearm, and can also help to prevent jams and other problems. However, the chamfering process can sometimes cause burrs to develop on the inside and outside of the cartridge case. A deburring tool can be used to remove these burrs, ensuring that the cartridge case is smooth and ready for the next step in the reloading process.
A deburring tool is an important tool for the reloading process, and can be used to remove burrs from the inside and outside of the cartridge case. By removing burrs, a deburring tool can help to ensure that the finished cartridge is smooth, consistent, and ready for use.

Chamfering tool

[return to top of section]
A chamfering tool is a specialized tool that is designed to create a smooth, angled edge on the inside and outside of the cartridge case. This tool typically consists of a pair of angled cutting blades, which are used to remove material from the inside and outside of the cartridge case, creating a smooth, angled edge.
Chamfering is a process that is used in the reloading process to create a smooth, angled edge on the inside and outside of the cartridge case. This is an important step in the reloading process, as it can help to ensure that the cartridge case is properly aligned in the chamber of the firearm, and can also help to prevent jams and other problems.
There are several reasons why chamfering may be needed during the reloading process. Some of the key situations in which chamfering may be needed include:
  • After trimming: After the cartridge case has been trimmed to the correct length using a trimmer, it is common for sharp edges to develop on the inside and outside of the cartridge case. These sharp edges can cause problems with the proper functioning of the cartridge, and can also lead to dangerous pressure levels in the cartridge case. Chamfering can be used to create a smooth, angled edge on the inside and outside of the cartridge case, which can help to prevent jams and other problems.
  • After multiple reloadings: Over time, the inside and outside of the cartridge case may become rough or uneven due to repeated reloading and firing. In some cases, this can cause problems with the proper functioning of the cartridge, and can also lead to dangerous pressure levels in the cartridge case. Chamfering can be used to create a smooth, angled edge on the inside and outside of the cartridge case, which can help to prevent jams and other problems.
  • When using multiple cartridges: In some cases, a shooter may need to reload cartridges of different types, such as rifle cartridges and pistol cartridges. In these cases, it may be necessary to use chamfering to adjust the inside and outside of the cartridge case to the correct dimensions for each specific cartridge. This can help to ensure that the finished cartridges are consistent and ready to use, and can prevent problems with the proper functioning of the cartridge.
Chamfering is an important step in the reloading process, and can be used to create a smooth, angled edge on the inside and outside of the cartridge case. By chamfering the cartridge case, a shooter can help to ensure that the finished cartridge is consistent, safe, and ready for use. Chamfering can help to prevent jams and other problems, and can also help to ensure that the cartridge case is properly aligned in the chamber of the firearm, which is critical for the safe and effective functioning of the cartridge.

 

Selecting the right Brass and Bullets

[return to table of contents]

When selecting brass and bullets for reloading, there are a few key factors to consider. First, you need to make sure that the brass and bullets are compatible with the caliber of your firearm. Each caliber has its own specific dimensions, so you need to choose brass and bullets that are designed for that caliber. You should also consider the type of brass and bullet that you want to use. For example, some brass is made from a higher-quality alloy than others, and some bullets are designed for specific purposes, such as hunting or target shooting. Additionally, you should consider the type of powder and primer that you will be using, as these components must also be compatible with the brass and bullet you choose. Finally, you should also consider the availability and cost of the brass and bullet that you want to use. Some types of brass and bullets may be harder to find or more expensive than others.

There are a few different ways to get brass for reloading. One option is to buy new brass from a supplier that specializes in reloading supplies. You can also try looking for brass at gun shows, or you can save your own brass after you’ve fired it by using a brass catcher on your firearm. Some shooters also trade brass with other shooters, so you could try asking around at your local shooting range to see if anyone is interested in trading. Finally, you can also try looking for once-fired brass for sale online, but be sure to only buy from a reputable source to ensure that you are getting high-quality brass.

Safety measures to follow when Reloading

[return to table of contents]
Like any hobby or activity that involves firearms, there are important safety considerations to keep in mind when reloading ammunition. Some of the key safety considerations for this hobby include:
  • Always follow the instructions in your reloading manual: Reloading manuals are an essential tool for anyone who is interested in reloading ammunition, as they provide detailed information on the proper techniques and safety precautions for the reloading process. It is important to carefully read and follow the instructions in your reloading manual to ensure that you are reloading your ammunition safely and correctly.
  • Use the correct reloading components: Using the correct components is essential for the safe reloading of ammunition. This includes using the correct type and size of cartridge case, primer, powder, and projectile for the specific cartridge that you are reloading. Using the wrong components can result in dangerous pressure levels, which can lead to serious injury or damage to your firearm.
  • Keep your work area clean and organized: A clean and well-organized work area is important for the safe reloading of ammunition. This means keeping your reloading bench and tools free of clutter and debris, and making sure that everything is properly labeled and stored. This will help to prevent mistakes and accidents while reloading, and will make the process more enjoyable and efficient.
  • Wear eye and ear protection: Reloading ammunition involves the use of tools and equipment that can produce loud noises and flying debris. For this reason, it is important to always wear eye and ear protection when reloading ammunition. This will help to protect your hearing and vision, and will reduce the risk of injury while reloading.
  • Follow all local laws and regulations: The laws and regulations regarding the reloading of ammunition can vary depending on where you live. It is important to familiarize yourself with the local laws and regulations, and to make sure that you are following them when you are reloading your ammunition. This will help to ensure that you are engaging in this hobby safely and responsibly.
  • When reloading, ensure you have enough time to give the process your undivided attention. Do not reload when you are distracted and can’t concentrate. Worse, do not reload when high or under medication that will make you lose focus.
  • Store the powder and primers in their factory-bought containers that are well labeled. If you must put it in another container, ensure it is properly labeled and sealed after reloading.
Overall, the key to staying safe while reloading ammunition is to always follow the instructions in your reloading manual, use the correct components, keep your work area clean and organized, wear appropriate protective gear, and follow all local laws and regulations. By taking these precautions, you can enjoy the benefits of reloading ammunition while minimizing the risks involved.

 

What type of powder is used for reloading?

[return to table of contents]
There are many different types of powder that are commonly used in the reloading of ammunition. The type of powder that is best for a given application will depend on the type of cartridge being reloaded, as well as the desired performance from the finished cartridge. Some of the most common types of powder used in reloading include:
  • Single-base powders: Single-base powders are the most basic type of gunpowder, and are made from a single chemical compound. They are typically used in small-caliber cartridges, and are known for their consistent burning characteristics and low cost.
  • Double-base powders: Double-base powders are a more advanced type of gunpowder, and are made from a mixture of two chemical compounds. They are typically used in larger-caliber cartridges, and are known for their high performance and clean-burning characteristics.
  • Triple-base powders: Triple-base powders are a specialized type of gunpowder that is made from a mixture of three chemical compounds. They are typically used in large-caliber, high-performance cartridges, and are known for their exceptional performance and clean-burning characteristics.
  • Fast-burning powders: Fast-burning powders are a type of gunpowder that is designed to burn quickly and produce a high level of pressure in the cartridge case. They are typically used in small-caliber cartridges, and are known for their ability to produce high velocities from small projectiles.
  • Slow-burning powders: Slow-burning powders are a type of gunpowder that is designed to burn slowly and produce a lower level of pressure in the cartridge case. They are typically used in large-caliber cartridges, and are known for their ability to produce high velocities from heavy projectiles.
In general, the type of powder that is best for a given application will depend on the type of cartridge that is being reloaded, as well as the desired performance from the finished cartridge. It is important to carefully follow the instructions in your reloading manual and use the correct type of powder for your specific application in order to ensure the safe and effective reloading of ammunition.

What types of Primers are used for reloading?

[return to table of contents]
There are two main types of primers used for reloading: boxer and berdan. Boxer primers are the most common type of primer used in the United States. They have a single flash hole in the center of the primer and are designed to be struck by the firing pin of a gun, igniting the primer and then the powder charge. Boxer primers are easy to reload because they can be removed from the spent cartridge case and used again. Berdan primers, on the other hand, have two flash holes and are commonly used in European and Asian ammunition. Berdan primers are more difficult to reload because they cannot be removed from the cartridge case and must be replaced with a new primer. Most reloading manuals will specify which type of primer to use for a given load.

The step-by-step ammunition reloading process

[return to table of contents]
Reloading is the process of preparing and loading cartridges for firearms. The basic principles of reloading involve the use of specialized tools and equipment to resize, shape, and load the components of spent cartridges, creating new, ready-to-use cartridges.
The process of reloading typically involves several steps, including:

1. Inspecting, cleaning, and preparing the cases

[return to top of section]

Once a cartridge is fired, the case loses its original shape because it is forced outward against the chamber’s walls. So, before the case can be used again, it has to be resized to hold the new bullet. The first step is to inspect the case to ensure there is nothing that will prevent it from safe reloading. Check if there are excessive bulges or if the case’s mouth has splits. Do not reuse cases with defects.

Remove the spent primer from the base of the cartridge case. This is typically done using a primer pocket cleaning tool, which is a specialized tool that is designed to remove the spent primer from the base of the cartridge case.

Using hot water and soap to clean the cases. Alternatively, you can use a commercial case cleaner. Ensure there is no dirt left that can scratch the sizing die. If you have a cleaning medium, you can polish the case.

Lubricating the case will reduce friction as the sizer die uses force. Unless you are using a carbide ring in the sizer die, lubricate the case’s body. Avoid greasing the shoulder of the case so as not to cause dents. Using a case neck brush, lubricate the inside of the case necks lightly. This will reduce the force used in the sizing; hence the brass will not be overworked.

2. Resizing the cartridge case

[return to top of section]
The cartridge case is the part of the cartridge that holds all of the other components, including the powder, primer, and projectile. In order to reload the cartridge, the cartridge case must be resized to its original dimensions, which ensures that it will fit properly in the chamber of the firearm and function correctly. This is typically done using a full-length sizing die, which is a specialized tool that is used in conjunction with a reloading press.
  • Install a shell holder onto the press machine. The shell holder will securely hold the cartridge case.
  • Install the sizer die onto the press machine, ensuring it touches the shell holder when the press stroke is at the top. Raise the press handle to leave space to adjust the large lock ring. (about an eighth to a quarter of a turn).
  • Put the press handle in the up position and then insert a cartridge case into the shell holder.
  • Lower the press handle slowly and gently to the bottom and let the case get into the sizer die. This will resize the case as required while pushing the fired primer from inside the case.
  • Now raise the press handle. This is to lower the case, expanding its mouth and setting the case neck so it can tightly hold a bullet.
  • Trim the case to its required length, if necessary
  • If the case has become longer due to plenty of firings, you will have to trim it so it can properly fit in the chamber.
  • Using a trimmer, trim the case to its original case length. You can use a digital caliper or a dial to know the required case length. Next, use a deburring tool to remove chamfer and burr from the exterior and interior of the case mouth so that a bullet can sit well in the case.

3. Priming the cartridge case

[return to top of section]
The primer is a small, sensitive explosive that is located in the base of the cartridge case. When the cartridge is fired, the primer is struck by the firing pin, which ignites the powder and propels the projectile out of the cartridge case. In order to reload the cartridge, a new primer must be installed in the base of the cartridge case. This is typically done using a primer seating tool, which is a specialized tool that is used in conjunction with a reloading press.
  • Put a fresh primer into the cup of the primer arm with the anvil side facing up.
  • Ensure the primer is seated firmly at the bottom of the primer pocket.
  • Now that the case is ready, sit it upright in the pressing ram and hold it with the shell holder.
  • Move the case up into the sizing die.
  • Gently raise the press handle. This will draw the case out of the primer pocket and lower it into the primer pocket.
After the new primer has been installed, it is important to inspect the cartridge case to ensure that the primer has been seated correctly and is not protruding from the base of the cartridge case. This is critical, as a misaligned or improperly seated primer can cause dangerous pressure levels in the cartridge case, which can lead to serious injury or damage to the firearm.
The process of priming the cartridge case is a critical step in the reloading of ammunition, and involves the use of specialized tools and equipment to install a new primer in the base of the cartridge case. By following the correct procedures and using the appropriate tools, it is possible to prime cartridge cases safely and effectively, ensuring that the finished cartridges are consistent and ready to use.

4. Charging the cartridge case with powder

[return to top of section]

Powder is the primary propellant in a cartridge, and is responsible for generating the pressure that propels the projectile out of the cartridge case. In order to reload the cartridge, the correct amount of powder must be dispensed into the cartridge case. This is typically done using a powder measure, which is a specialized tool that is used in conjunction with a reloading press.

charging the cartridge case with powder is a crucial step that involves carefully measuring out the right amount of gunpowder and pouring it into the cartridge case. This step is typically performed using a powder measure, which is a device that dispenses a specific, pre-determined amount of powder with each pull of the handle.

To charge a cartridge case with powder, you will need the following items:

  • Powder measure
  • Powder funnel
  • Gunpowder
  • Cartridge case
  • Scale (optional, but highly recommended)
Here is the basic process for charging a cartridge case with powder:
  1. Begin by setting up your reloading workstation in a well-ventilated area. Make sure you have all of the necessary tools and equipment within easy reach.
  2. Next, choose the appropriate gunpowder for the type of cartridge you are loading. Check the reloading manual for the recommended powder type and charge weight for the cartridge you are using.
  3. Using a scale (if available), weigh out the appropriate amount of gunpowder. If you do not have a scale, refer to the manufacturer’s instructions for the recommended powder charge.
  4. Once you have the correct amount of powder, place the cartridge case on the powder measure and adjust the measure to dispense the correct amount of powder.
  5. Carefully pour the powder into the cartridge case using the powder funnel. Be sure to pour the powder evenly and avoid getting any on the outside of the case.
Once the cartridge case is charged with the correct amount of powder, carefully set it aside and proceed to the next step in the reloading process.

5. Seating the projectile

[return to top of section]
The projectile is the part of the cartridge that is fired out of the cartridge case when the cartridge is fired. In order to reload the cartridge, the projectile must be positioned and seated correctly in the cartridge case. This is typically done using a bullet seating die, which is a specialized tool that is used in conjunction with a reloading press.
  • Place and thread a seating die into the press.
  • Secure the case on the shell holder and lower the press handle so that the case sits at the top of the press stroke.
  • Place a bullet with the base on the case’s mouth using your hand.
  • Lower the press and guide the bullet into the seater die, ensuring it does not tip.
  • Continue lowering the press to let the case and bullet into the die until the bullet is fully seated.
  • Raise the handle to note the seating depth. If the loaded round needs to sit deeper, lower the handle to get it back to the die, then raise the handle and check once more.
  • Continue adjusting till you get the correct seating depth, then tighten the locknut to ensure the bullet seater plug is secure.

6. Crimping the cartridge case

[return to top of section]
In some cases, the cartridge case may be crimped to help hold the projectile in place and prevent it from moving or shifting during handling or firing. This is typically done using a crimping die, which is a specialized tool that is used in conjunction with a reloading press. The crimping die has a cavity that matches the shape of the case mouth and a stem that applies pressure to the case. The reloader will adjust the die to the desired crimp depth and then run the case through the press, crimping the case in the process. Crimping is important because it helps to prevent the bullet from moving or slipping in the case, which can affect accuracy and performance.

 

Benefits of reloading

[return to table of contents]

If you are not sure whether to buy new ammo every time you are short of supply or whether reloading is worth it, here are some of the reasons why others prefer handloading:

Reloading can save you money

[return to top of section]

If you are a frequent shooter, reloading your ammunition will be cheaper than buying factory-made. The initial cost of the reloading components will be costly, but after setting them up, homemade ammo is considerably cheaper than factory-made.

Another key factor to consider is time. While you might save some money, it is crucial to note reloading is a mechanical process that takes time. That said, reloading is worth it if you have time on your hands and the equipment set up. You will save on your ammo, especially if you use it more often and find it difficult to find specific factory-made ammo that suits your needs.

Reloading is cost-effective because you can reuse brass up to 6 to 15 times. So, for example, if you are recycling bass, you could save $68.59 for 300 RUM ammo over buying from the factory, while you could spend $20.59 less reloading 6.5 Creedmore as compared to factory bought.

Customize your bullets for specific needs

[return to top of section]

Reloading can increase the accuracy of your ammunition. It is a fact that rifle chambers differ from one rifle to the other. Customizing your brass to fit well in your chamber might increase the rifle’s accuracy.

If you change the weight of the bullet, in some cases, you might find that your riffle shoots better with either a lighter or heavier bullet. The correct weight of the bullet will ultimately make your rifle increase shooting accuracy. Hence, with reloading, you can fine-tune your load to suit your specific gun type.

Shoot without limitations

[return to top of section]

Ammo is not exactly cheap. Reloading might be a great option if you want enough ammunition for shooting practice or hunting. When your store-bought ammo is depleted, homemade loads can be useful for increasing your stock.

If there is a shortage of factory-made ammunition, or your ammo store runs short of supplies, you can reload and have enough for emergencies or your hunting needs.

Can reduce recoil

[return to top of section]

With reloading, you can customize it according to your shooting style. Your rifle might be producing too much recoil for you. Or, you might be fine with it, but if you share it with other family members who find the recoil too high, you might want to reduce the recoil.

By making your ammunition, you can make a bullet and powder that can result in less recoil and, therefore, more comfortable shooting. Use published reloading data to get scientifically proven data when selecting your powders.

When tailoring your load to reduce recoil, you can choose a different powder that is faster burning to ease loads or start loads better. It is best to ensure the powder is recommended in the load data book.

It is a fun activity that can be a hobby

[return to top of section]

Many people find reloading to be a satisfying craft. Keeping up with the bullet and powder advancements and increasing your knowledge in accuracy techniques is exciting.

You can start with reloading manuals, the right tools, and the components needed for creating ammo. The more one knows how to make homemade loads, the more exciting it becomes and can become a hobby. (Atleast for some.)

Common Mistakes to avoid in reloading

[return to table of contents]

There are many common mistakes that new reloaders can make when starting out in the hobby. Some of the most common mistakes to avoid include:

  • Not following the instructions in your reloading manual: Reloading manuals provide detailed instructions and safety guidelines for reloading specific calibers and types of ammunition. It’s important to carefully read and follow these instructions to ensure that your reloaded ammunition is safe and effective.
  • Using the wrong components: Different types of brass, bullets, powder, and primers are designed for specific calibers and purposes. It’s important to choose the right components for your specific needs, and to make sure that they are compatible with each other.
  • Not measuring powder accurately: Powder is a crucial component of reloaded ammunition, and it’s important to measure it accurately to ensure consistent performance and safety. Using a powder measure or scale can help you measure powder accurately and consistently.
  • Not inspecting brass and bullets carefully: Before you start reloading, it’s important to inspect your brass and bullets carefully to make sure they are in good condition and free of defects. This can help you avoid problems such as split or damaged brass, or bullets that are not properly seated in the case.
  • Not cleaning and lubricating brass properly: Cleaning and lubricating your brass can help it last longer and perform better. Be sure to follow the instructions in your reloading manual to clean and lubricate your brass properly.
  • Not following safety guidelines: Reloading can be a safe and enjoyable hobby, but it’s important to follow safety guidelines at all times to avoid accidents. This includes using proper ventilation, wearing protective equipment, and storing reloaded ammunition safely.

Troubleshooting tips for problems with reloading

[return to table of contents]

If you encounter problems during the reloading process, there are a few troubleshooting tips that can help you fix them. Some common problems that reloaders may encounter, and possible solutions, include:

  • Stuck or difficult-to-remove primers: If you are having trouble removing a primer from a spent cartridge case, you can try using a primer pocket reamer or a primer pocket scraper to remove it. These tools can help you remove the primer without damaging the case.
  • Split or damaged brass: If you encounter split or damaged brass, you can try using a case mouth deburring tool to remove the burrs and smooth out the edges of the case. You can also try annealing the brass to make it softer and more pliable.
  • Inconsistent powder charges: If you are getting inconsistent powder charges, you may need to adjust your powder measure or scale to achieve more accurate and consistent results. You can also try using a different type of powder or a different method of measuring powder, such as a trickler or a powder dispenser.
  • Bullets not seated properly: If your bullets are not seated properly in the case, you can try using a bullet seating die that has a built-in crimp to help hold the bullet in place. You can also try using a different type of bullet seating die or a different bullet seating technique.
  • Inconsistent bullet accuracy: If your reloaded ammunition is not shooting accurately, you may need to adjust your bullet seating depth or crimp to achieve better results. You can also try using a different type of bullet or powder to see if that improves accuracy. If you are still having problems, it’s a good idea to consult a reloading manual or seek advice from an experienced reloader.

Here are a few additional troubleshooting tips for dealing with problems that may arise during the reloading process:

  • If you are having trouble sizing your brass, you may need to adjust your sizing die or use a different method of sizing. You can also try lubricating your brass before sizing it to make it easier to resize.
  • If your reloaded ammunition is not cycling properly in your firearm, you may need to adjust the overall length of your cartridges or the amount of powder you are using. You can also try using a different type of bullet or primer to see if that improves cycling.
  • If your reloaded ammunition is not firing, you may have a problem with the primer or the powder. You can try using a different brand of primer or a different type of powder to see if that fixes the problem. You can also try inspecting your cartridge case and primer pocket for debris or other problems that may prevent the primer from igniting the powder.
  • If you are having trouble with your reloading press or other equipment, you can try cleaning and lubricating it to see if that fixes the problem. You can also consult the user manual for your equipment or seek advice from an experienced reloader to troubleshoot the problem.

In general, it’s important to carefully inspect your brass, bullets, and other components before you start reloading, and to pay attention to the instructions in your reloading manual. If you encounter problems during the reloading process, don’t be afraid to ask for help or advice from other experienced reloaders. They can often provide valuable insights and solutions to common problems.

Top suppliers of reloading equipment

[return to table of contents]

Many companies sell reloading supplies, but some of the most consistent and reliable companies (in terms of getting what you want and good customer service) include:

Brownells

Brownells have been at the top of their game for over 80 years. Their extensive experience has given them a reputation in the gun community, from amateurs to veteran reloaders.

They are one of the largest online suppliers of reloading equipment with good customer service.

Kentucky Gun Company

The Kentucky Gun Company boasts a massive range of reloading equipment with some of the most competitive prices. They offer free shipping for most of their products, ensuring they arrive on time and are well packaged to protect the guns and ammo.

Sportsman’s Warehouse

At Sportsman’s Warehouse, you can shop for guns and reloading equipment that you need. There is a good variety of bullets, powders, and brass in the store at competitive rates. Moreover, you can test and have a feel of hunting equipment at their store to know what you want to buy.

They also offer free shipping for orders above $49.00 and have excellent customer service.

Powder valley

Powder Valley has been around since 1984 and boasts of being the largest supplier of canister powder in the US. Besides that, they supply bullets, gun care products, shots, wads, and ammunition.

You can check their website and buy most products from their online store.

Natchez Shooters Supplies

Natchez Shooters Supplies has been in operation since 1979, and from their website, you can buy many gun care accessories and reloading equipment.

Top reloading forums

[return to table of contents]

You might have specific queries about firearms and their care at times. In such cases, a community of other people in the gun culture might help you with the answers. They might be shooters with more experience on how to use your tool, or you might share places with good deals and information on reloading and firearm care.

Forums can make good communities to speak to others about your interests in gunsmithing. Here are some of the great online forums where you can have discussions and get or share information on reloading:

Top manuals and reloading books

[return to table of contents]

A handloading manual is one of the most vital tools in reloading. To avoid mishaps and be at the top of your game, you need a manual with accurate, up-to-date, clear instructions on the step-by-step, complete with photos of the equipment.

While there are loads of manuals and books on reloading out there, here are some of the great ones:

  • Hornady 11th Edition Handbook of Cartridge Reloading
  • Nosler Reloading Guide 9
  • Sierra 6th Edition Rifle Handgun Reloading Data
  • Lyman 50th Edition Reloading Handbook
  • The Beginner’s Guide to Reloading Ammunition
  • The ABCs of Reloading 10th Edition
  • LEE PRECISION Modern Reloading 2nd Edition

The best reloading apps

[return to table of contents]

Technology has made it easier for handloading as you can access and store reloading information on your phone or computing device. Here are some apps that can help you with your reloading process—from calculating costs to guides on reloading.

ReLOADeD (Ammo) – Available for iPhone and iPad

This app helps you store your reloading information in one place, thus allowing you to organize your data easily.

Reloading Calculator – Ammo

The app calculates for you the cost of reloading any kind of ammunition. The app can compare reloading costs with factory-made rounds from retail shops and see if it’s worth it.

Reloading Assistant

The Reloading Assistant helps you break down the cost of reloading by calculating the total cost of the components used for each round. You can then use this data to compare versus the cost of store-bought ammunition.

Vihtavuori Reload

This app guides you during your reloading process and also helps track how you use your reloading components for various weapons and calibers. It also contains valuable reloading data.

Hornady Reloading App

This mobile app contains all the features of Hornady’s reloading handbook. With the Hornady Reloading app, you have all the information you need to reload various rifle cartridges, whether you are a novice or veteran handloader.

Reloader’s Cloud

This is a free service where you can record reloading data, keep records about your firearm configuration, and record your shots, among other things.

References

[return to table of contents]

Step by Step Reloading. (n.d.). RCBS. https://www.rcbs.com/rcbs-how-to-reload/rcbs-step-by-step-reloading.html

05 :: Reloading Process. (n.d.). Retrieved from projects.nfstc.org website: https://projects.nfstc.org/firearms/module05/fir_m05_t11_06_a.htm

Childs, J. (2020, January 11). To Roll’ Em Or Not: The Economics of Reloading. Recoil. https://www.recoilweb.com/to-roll-em-or-not-the-economics-of-reloading-155065.html

How To Reload Ammo- Basic Supplies & Reloading Benefits. (n.d.). Ammo Board. Retrieved September 29, 2022, from https://www.ammoboard.com/blog/how-to-reload-ammo-basic-supplies-reloading-benefits

Best Place to Buy Reloading Supplies. (n.d.). RE Factor Tactical. Retrieved September 30, 2022, from https://blog.refactortactical.com/blog/best-place-to-buy-reloading-supplies

The History of Handloading: Not Just a Fad Anymore | Load Data Article. (2016). Loaddata.com. https://loaddata.com/Article/LoadDevelopment/The-History-of-Handloading-Not-Just-a-Fad-Anymore/448

What do I need to start reloading. (n.d.). Www.lymanproducts.com. Retrieved September 30, 2022, from https://www.lymanproducts.com/start-reloading

Reloading Safety. (n.d.). Www.speer.com. https://www.speer.com/reloading/reloading-safety.html